Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 19th Nano Congress for Next Generation Brussels,Belgium.

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Day 1 :

  • Advanced Nanomaterials
Location: 1
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Han-Yong Jeon, geosynthetics/technical organic materials researcher and he was the 32nd President of Korean Fiber Society (2014~2015). He has published more than 794 papers in domestic and international conferences. He wrote 19 texts including 'GEOSYNTHETICS’ and also published 117 papers in domestic & international journals. He has awards of Marquis Who'sWho - Science and Engineering in 2003~2016 and also, he got the 33rd Academy Award of Korean Fiber Society in 2006 and “Excellent Paper Award of 2012” by The Korean Federation of Science and Technology Societies.

Abstract:

“Green” revolution is rapidly increasing in every construction sites, especially between construction and societies’ needs. Furthermore, although durability of geosynthetics should be emphasized for long-term service period, durability controlled mechanism could be required to fulfil the short-term degradability purpose for green geosynthetics. “Green Geosynthetics” are made of eco-environmental biodegradable polymeric resins or natural materials and they must maintain their needed performance such as durability, design strength, hydraulic property etc. during service period in the application field. Then, after service period they should be degraded no harmful state in the soil structures. The important concept of green geosynthetics is focused on their degradable behaviours of used resins and needed performance for engineering qualification with technical data of designing. In this study, technical availability of green geosynthetics was introduced and reviewed to be related to the quantitative analysis of biodegradability of green geosynthetics by conceptual consideration through its evaluation. Still now, there is no international test method to evaluate the biodegradability of green geosynthetics performance and only the geosynthetics performance test methods of ISO and ASTM International are applied for this purpose. However, it is not reasonable for green geosynthetics to adopt these test methods directly and new test methods should be introduced for green geosynthetics performance testing. In this study, the regulation of evaluation method of biodegradability for green geosynthetics between index and field tests is proposed by connection key factor to confirm the biodegradable behaviors for green geosynthetics.

Speaker
Biography:

P. M. Dinh received her Ph.D. in 2002 in high energy nuclear physics (Institute for Theoretical Physics in Saclay, France), and has been recruited in 2003 at the Laboratory for Theoretical Physics of Toulouse. She now works on the theory of multi-electronic systems (clusters, molecules) excited by intense electromagnetic fields (lasers, charged projectiles), within time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and beyond. She is a developer of the TDDFT code "TELEMAN". She has published 59 referred articles including 3 reviews and 3 book chapters, and wrote 3 books. She is a Junior member of the Institut Universitaire de France since 2012.

Abstract:

The quantum description of dissipative mechanisms in finite quantum systems is a long standing question in physics. It was originally addressed in nuclear physics, in particular a few decades ago, with the development of classical and semiclassical approaches but without no convincing fully quantum one. Therefore, many dynamical scenarios (where quantum effects still play a role in spite of dissipative trends) cannot be treated. Meanwhile, a strong experimental motivation, now in the case of nanostructures and molecules irradiated by intense lasers, has shown up. This motivated an increasing number of theoretical investigations, mostly on the basis of the well developed Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a robust effective mean field description of many low energy dynamical scenarios. Still, these TDDFT approaches fail to account for dissipative effects leading to the (observed) electronic pattern. There is thus a crucial need for a formal and practical route to account for dissipative/thermalization features on top of quantum mean field. We propose here a formalism allowing to describe the collisional correlations responsible for thermalization effects in finite quantum electronic systems. The approach is built as a stochastic extension of TDDFT. Dynamical correlations are treated in time-dependent perturbation theory and stochastic loss of coherence is assumed at some time intervals. This theory was formulated long ago for density matrices but never applied in practical cases because of its computational involvement. With a recent reformulation of the theory, applications are now conceivable and first tests have been successfully led in a simplifed 1D model.

Speaker
Biography:

    Franco Palla present working at University of Palermo, Laboratory of Biology and Biothecnology for Cultural Heritage,

Via Archirafi 38, Palermo, 90123, Italy

Abstract:

In the last decade science and technology have provided protocols in defining innovative restoration strategies. In our laboratory

bioactive molecules, isolated from plants or marine organisms, are characterized and applied in order to control the microbial

colonization on historic-artistic manufacts. Similarly, these molecules are able to inhibit fungal and/or bacterial growth to

acting like chemical biocides.

Marine organisms also represent a source of cold-active enzymes (hydrolases) useful in biocleaning / bioremoval

 protocols, in order to remove protein or ester layers from the artwork surfaces.‚Ä®These represent valid alternatives

 to conventional strategies, free from negative impacts on human health and environment.

Speaker
Biography:

Alexander Krivcov is doing his PhD at the University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern with the topic “Characterisation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications with Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM)”.

Abstract:

 

Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) are of increasing  interest in biomedicine. The wide range of applications, from diagnostic (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI) to cancer-cells treatment (hyperthermia), promises an intensive use possibility. However, detection and characterization of SPNs at single particle level especially in biological samples remains a challenge. Therefore, techniques which can provide spatial distribution and magnetic properties of single magnetic nanoparticles are highly desirable.

Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) can be used to detect and spatially localize single SPNs. However, arising magnetic signal from nanoparticles could be disturbed and covered by other existing forces. One of the strongest disturbing forces is the electro-static behaviour of the probes. Due to the conductivity of the MFM measuring tip, both, magnetic and electro-static, forces are detected simultaneously.

In this work different approaches to minimize the electro-static interaction between probe and tip are discussed. We showed the possibility to reduce the electro-static force by choosing substrates with higher conductivity. Furthermore the electro-static behaviour can be reduced using Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) combined with MFM.

Those approaches are investigated to select the magnetic force and therefore allow MFM to serve as an excellent detecting technique which makes it possible to localize single magnetic nanoparticles on substrates, embedded in polymers and injected in biomaterial.

 

Speaker
Biography:

J. Jou has completed his PhD in 1986 from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, and worked as a postdoctoral visiting scientiest at IBM-Almden Research Center, San Jose, CA, USA from 1986 to 1988, before joining National Tsing Hua University. He has published more than 140 papers in reputed journals and been granted more than 60 patents from USA, China and Taiwan.

Abstract:

Nano structures enable organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices to be fabricated with with relatively high efficiency and brightness, opening up a new era for high quality displays and lighting. Along with the incorporation of nano-scale carrier-modulation-interlayer(s) in between emission layers containing sunlight emission complementary dyes, sunlight-style OLED can be obtained with color or color temperature mimicking that of the sun throughtout the entire daytime. We are also able to fabricate blue hazard free, low color temperature candlelight-style OLED by employing candlelight complementary emitters, namely orange-red, yellow, green, and sky-blue. The resultant candlelight OLED, that exhibits a 1,900K color temperature exactly like that of candles or oil lamps, is friendly to human eyes, physiologies, ecosystems, artifacts, and night-skies. Specifically, it is at least 10 times safer from retina protection perspective or 5 times better for melatonin to naturally occur after dusk, as comparing with the blue light-enriched white OLED, LED and CFL counterparts. We will hence present the device structure, physics and engineering behind the serendipity of the first sunlight-style OLED, how the nano-interlayer modulates the injection of carriers and their recombination, and why and how tremendous efforts have then after been moved to the development of  a 'good light' that is blue hazard free, high in light-quality and   energy-saving. The presentation will also cover global attention and development progress of the candlelight OLED.

Speaker
Biography:

Ying-Chieh Lee has completed his PhD at the age of 14 years from Departmant of Materials and Science and Engineering, National Chung-Hsin University. He is Dean of Office Research and Development, National PingTung University of Science and Technology. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy resistive thin films were prepared on glass and Al2O3 substrates by DC magnetron co-sputtering from targets of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y casting alloy and Dy metals. Electrical properties and microstructures of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy films under different proportion of elements and annealing temperatures were investigated. The phase evolution, microstructural and composition of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy resistive films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM),  transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). When the annealing temperature was set to 350 °C, the Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy films with an amorphous structure was observed. It is found that the resistivity of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y films was increased with increasing of Dy content. The Ni-Cr-Mn-Y films with 33.2% Dy addition annealed at 300 °C which was exhibited the resistivity 1600 mW-cm with -8.2 ppm/°C of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR).

Speaker
Biography:

Seifelislam has completed his M.Sc. in sustainable energy from Hamad Bin Khalifa University and B.Sc. in mechanical engineering from Qatar University. He was awarded the first place award in the national scientific research forum in 2012. He has been working as a research assistant at the mechanical engineering department of Qatar University since 2013. His main research focus is heat transfer, thermofluids and dynamics, and nanotechnology. He has published several papers in reputed journals related to heat transfer and thermal comfort.

 

Abstract:

during hot summer months. By replacing the conventional single pipe evaporator with a double pipe evaporator in Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, there is a great potential for an enhanced thermal performance. In this study, a homogeneous nanofluid of dispersed Carbon Nano Tubes (CNT) was used as the secondary fluid in the double pipe evaporator of a 17 kW HVAC system. Three concentrations of CNT nanofluid of 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 by weight percentage were circulated separately using a small 104 W pump connected to a 150 liters tank. The AC unit was placed in a 45 m3 balanced calorimeter of 2.24 kW heat load. Experimental results showed a promising reduction in the compressor work and an increase in the system Coefficient of Performance (COP). The collected data showed that system thermal performance depended on the evaporator secondary fluid flowrate more than condenser secondary fluid flowrate. By increasing the concentration of CNT nanofluid, the compressor work was shown to decrease while the COP was shown to increase. In comparison with the standard rated AC unit, utilizing a double-pipe evaporator and a condenser with maximum nanofluid concentration resulted in a decrease of about 52% in the compressor work and a similar percentage of increase in the system COP. As a result of the enhanced heat transfer, the operating electrical current was reduced by 30% in comparison to the rated compressor current.

Speaker
Biography:

Claire Deeb has completed her Ph.D. from the University of Technology of Troyes (France) and postdoctoral research activities from Argonne National Laboratory (IL, USA) and Northwestern University (IL, USA). She currently is a research scientist at C2N - CNRS where she conducts research in the field of optics, active plasmonics, and nanophotonics. Claire is collaborating with leading groups at UIUC (IL, USA) and LMU-Munich and has led many international projects. She has given 11 invited talks and has published over 13 papers and one book chapter. Additionally, she has received 2 PhD awards and has been serving as an editorial board member of PNN.

Abstract:

Gaps formed between metal surfaces control the coupling of localized plasmons, thus
allowing gap-tuning targeted to exploit the enhanced optical fields for different applications. Classical electrodynamics fails to describe this coupling across sub-nm gaps, where quantum effects become important owing to non-local screening and spill-out of electrons.1-3 The advantages of narrow gap antennas have mostly been demonstrated for processes like SERS that are excited optically, but promising new phenomena appear when such antennas are fed by electric generators.1,4 However, the extreme difficulty of engineering and probing an electrically driven optical nanogap antenna has limited experimental investigations of physical concepts at stake in these conditions. The feasibility of structuring electron-fed antennas as nano-light sources has been recently demonstrated;4 however, this configuration remains very limited: too much power was lost as heat when operating the optical antenna, and the antenna operation time was limited by the structure lifetime to sustain a bias voltage for a few hours. The innovative structure that we suggest here will cope with all these limitations: ALD dielectric materials substitute the air gap to improve the antenna stability; a quantum efficiency of 10-1 is targeted owing to a significantly efficient antenna (2 orders of magnitude higher field enhancement). The resulting source will
operate at room temperature and have a tunable spectral response (ranging from visible frequencies to THz regime) defined by the antenna geometry and the applied bias.5 Also, this source will be compact, Si-compatible, and will not request specific emitting materials (e.g. III-V semi-conductors) to operate.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Yoshitaka Fujimoto received his Ph.D. degree in Engineering from Osaka University, Japan. After receiving his Ph. D., he worked at the University of Tokyo and the University of Tsukuba. He joined Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology as an Assistant Professor. He has published more than 50 technical papers in peer-reviewed journals, reviews, book, book chapters, etc. and has served as referee of many international journals, organizer and committee in conferences.

Abstract:

Since experimental realization of a graphene sheet, two-dimensional atomic-layer sheets have received much attention from the viewpoint of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Among them, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) atomic-layer sheets are also expected to an important material since they possess several superior properties similar to a graphene. In the aspect of the electronic structures, both two materials exhibit considerably different features; graphene is a zero-gap material, whereas h-BN monolayer is a wide-gap material. One of the effective ways to tune electronic properties of nanomaterials is to apply strains to them. For example, the band gaps and the impurity states of h-BN monolayers are tunable by applying strains [1,2].
In this talk, I will report strain effects on the stabilities and the electronic properties of h-BN atomic layers using first-principles density-functional calculations [3,4]. I demonstrate the possible methods to tune the band gaps and the ionization energies of the impurity induced states in h-BN atomic layers. We also discuss the relationship among applied strains, band gaps and the impurity-related states of h-BN atomistic layers.

Speaker
Biography:

I am fereidoon bondarian, PhD student, and I am working in two field, the first one is Nano material a defect of that on secondary metabolite and second one working on some Nano particles that made from some plant extracts like eucalyptus.

Abstract:

Increasing tendency of human societies to use medicinal plants and products derived from them, reducing the cultivation of medicinal plants, faced with extinction, the negative effects of some chemical drugs in the long time, the cost and time of extraction of secondary metabolites are reason of using modern methods to achieve faster and cheaper to this class of compounds. In view of the importance of Papaver somniferum and the only human resources to achieve significant analgesic alkaloids like Morphine, Codeine and Papaverine, this study aimed at evaluating the changes of two secondary metabolites of this plant Thebaine and Papaverine affects Nano elicitors copper oxide and zinc oxide on callus root in the cell suspension at two concentrations and three times. After reviewing the HPLC chromatogram of the sample and the rate of change tables of Papaverine and Thebaine were observed in samples treated with nano elicitors, Thebaine and Papaverine treated with 0.237 gr/ml nano copper oxide at 96 h after induction towards zero time and the comparison with the control sample at the same time is considerably reduced. Other results include the highest percentage Thebaine treated with 0.162 g/ml nano zinc oxide at 144 h after induction noted 94.6472%.

Iman FarahBakhsh

University of Applied Science and Technology Iran

Title: E-BABE- Study of the mechanical alloyed Fe-Ni and its magnetic properties
Speaker
Biography:

Iman Farahbakhsh is currently an assistant professor of material science and metallurgy engineering at the Islamic Azad University in Iran. He has a BSC in material science and metallurgy engineering from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and MSC in extractive metallurgy from Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic) and PhD in Nanomaterials from Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST) and he was as visiting professor in Kumamoto University in Japan. He was involved in some international project till now and he has more than 10 ISI paper (WOS) in high quality journals and more than 40 international conference.

Abstract:

In this study, Fe50Ni50 alloy powders were synthesized by Mechanical alloying process using planetary high- energy ball mill (Pulverisette 5, Fritsch) for milling times: 2, 5, 10, 30, 50, 70 h and for the weight ratio of balls to powder (BPR) 30:1, under argon atmosphere. The alloy formation and different physical properties were studied as a function of milling time, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Increase in milling time, led to reduction in crystallite size (D) in the super paramagnetic phase, thus inducing a higher magnetization to the about 120 emu/g, which is significantly higher compared with the work of others. Also reduction in crystallite size led to lower coercivity. Optical studies showed that determined grain size based on hysteresis curve for 70h of milling time is in the same order of radiation wavelength.