Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 19th Nano Congress for Next Generation Brussels,Belgium.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Oliver G Schmidt

IFW Dresden, Germany

Keynote: Microtubular NEMS: from concepts to applications

Time : 10:00

Nano Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Oliver G Schmidt photo
Biography:

Oliver G Schmidt is a Director at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Germany, and holds a full Professorship for Material Systems for Nanoelectronics at the Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany. His scientific activities are focused on nano- and micro-materials and bridge across interdisciplinary research fields, ranging from nanoelectronics and microrobotics to energy storage devices and biomedical applications. He has received several awards: the Otto-Hahn Medal from the Max-Planck-Society in 2000, the Philip-Morris Research Award in 2002 and the Carus-Medal from the German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina in 2005. In 2010, he was awarded the Guinness World Record® for the smallest man-made jet engine and in 2011 he became Honorary Professor at Fudan Shanghai University. He received the International Dresden Barkhausen Award 2013, and since 2014 is the Chair of a new center for “Materials, Architectures and Integration of Nanomembranes (MAIN)”. He has published more than 600 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has given more than 250 invited talks worldwide.

Abstract:

Nanomembranes are thin, flexible, transferable and can be shaped into 3D microtubular nanomembrane architectures. This makes them attractive for a broad range of applications and scientific research fields ranging from novel hybrid heterostructure devices to ultra-compact 3D systems both on and off the chip. If nanomembranes are differentially strained they deform themselves and roll-up into microtubular structures upon release from their mother substrate. Rolled-up nanomembranes can be exploited to rigorously compact electronic circuitry and energy storage units. They can also serve as ideal platform to study novel photonic and plasmonic phenomena. As rolled-up microtubes can be easily tuned into the size range of single cells, they are perfectly suited to study single cell behavior in ultra-sensitive yet fully integrative lab-in-a-tube systems. As off-chip components, they address exciting environmental and biomedical applications such as biomimetic regenerative cuff implants or powerful self-propelling micro-autonomous systems. If magnetic tubes or helices are combined with spermatozoa, such hybrid micro-bio-robotic motors offer new perspectives towards paradigm shifting reproduction technologies.

Nano Congress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arturs Medvids photo
Biography:

Arturs Medvids obtained the degree Dr. Habil. Phys., specializing in Solid State Physics at Latvian University, Riga. He has been the Head of Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics at Riga Technical University since 1989. He was a Professor at the Institute of Technical Physics of Riga Technical University since 1995. In 2001, he worked in Japan as an Invited Professor in Shizuoka University. He was awarded the title of Honourable Guest Professor of Shizuoka University, Japan, in 2009, 2014 and 2016. He has published more than 560 scientific publications which includes papers, conference proceedings, books and patents.

Abstract:

A three-stage mechanism of ZnO nanoparticles formation at the surface of ZnO crystal by the forth harmonic of Nd:YAG laser radiation is proposed. The first stage is intensive generation and concentration of Zn interstitials at the irradiated surface of ZnO crystal by the laser. The second stage is agglomeration of Zn interstitials to Zn nanoparticles with the size depending on the number and intensity of laser pulses. The third stage is transformation of the Zn nanoparticles into ZnO nanoparticles due to oxidation of Zn nanoparticles in atmospheric environment using the same laser radiation. An evidence of Zn phase formation in ZnO crystal is appearance of 70 cm-1 band in Raman spectra after irradiation by the first and the second laser pulse. A new broad band at 561 cm-1 in Raman spectra is observed after irradiation by 5 laser pulses. The intensity of the band increases with the number of laser pulses and at the same time the intensity of the 70 cm-1 band decreases until it disappears. The nature of the band is connected with oxidation of Zn nanoparticles. It is the third stage of ZnO nanoparticles formation. Comparison analysis of the proposed laser method with the conventional methods of nanoparticles formation in semiconductors will be carried out.

  • Plenary Session

Session Introduction

Dominique Ausserré

CNRS , Le Mans University, France

Title: Introducing Backside Absorbing Layer Microscopy (BALM)
Speaker
Biography:

Dominique Ausserré has completed his PhD in Collège de France, Paris, has been visiting scientist in IBM, San Jose, the co-strated a soft matter lab  in Institut Curie, Paris, and then moved to Le Mans University in 1991.  He is Research Director in CNRS, France, and worked in the fields of  optics, polymer and statistical physics, material science, capillarity and surface physical chemistry, now moving towards biology and healthcare oriented technological developments. He invented self-assembled nano-composite materials made of nanoparticles and diblock copolymeris, self-assembled polar lamellar materials named Ferrochemicals, and the SEEC and BALM optical techniques. He was co-founder of two startups : Nanoraptor and Watch Live.      

Abstract:

BALM is a new wide field optical microscopy which is remarkably suited for nano enginnering. Most of the time, nano-objects have to be fixed on surfaces in order to be localized, handled, or used in combination with some environmental control. BALM is a surface imaging technique wich combines extreme (say SPR-like) sensitivity with full optical resolution. Moreover, its implementation  is confined in the half-space located below the sample, so that the upper half-space remains free for implementing environmental tools such as a fluidic cell, spectroscopic tools such as Raman analysis,  local measuring tools such as electrical and SPM probes or local fields of any type.  At last, it is a real time technique, hence offering large possibilities for kinetic studies.

Thanks to a close collaboration with Vincent Dreycke, Stephane Campidelli and Renaud Cornut in the LICSEN group of CEA Saclay, the power of the technique in the study of 2D materials was recently demontrated 1  . 

The aim of this talk is to forecast the next coming BALM applications, supported by preliminary results obtained  with various kinds of nanoparticles, sensor chips and solid liquid interfaces. The first principles of the technique will also be exposed.

Speaker
Biography:

Andriy Kovalenko is Senior Research Officer at the National Institute for Nanotechnology since 2003, and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. He earned his PhD degree (1993) in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics from Lviv State University, Bogolyubov’s Institute. He has been developing methodology and software implementation of statistical-mechanical, molecular theory of solvation, coupling it with electronic structure theories, molecular simulations, and docking protocols in a platform of predictive multiscale theory & modeling of chemical, supramolecular, and biomolecular systems constituting new advances towards a general framework of multiscale methods.

 

Abstract:

In recent two decades, molecular theory of solvation for nanostructures in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions, a.k.a. three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) with the Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) closure relation, was systematically developed and applied to a variety of compounds, supramolecules, and biomolecules in a number of solvents, solvent mixtures, electrolyte and non-electrolyte solutions. From the first principles of statistical mechanics, 3D-RISM-KH theory predicts the solvation structure and thermodynamics of nanochemical and biomolecular systems, including their analytical long-range asymptotics. It yields improved accuracy, efficiency, and applicability by coupling models and methods at different space and time scales to provide fundamental understanding and prediction for nanomaterials and biomolecules. The method has been coupled with quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, and dissipative particle dynamics. Examples include helical rosette nanotubes with tunable stability and hierarchy, water promoted inversion of supramolecular chirality, formation and stability of self-assembling supramolecular structures of organic rosette nanotubes with ordered shells of inner and outer water, and highly accurate & efficient dissipative particle dynamics of polymer chains with coarse-grained effective pair potential obtained from DRISM-KH theory. Recent applications of 3D-RISM-KH consist in multiscale coupling of quantum chemistry, molecular solvation theory, multi-time step molecular dynamics, and dissipative particle dynamics. Calculations show the dependence of the polymerization degree on organic solvents properties and temperature/pressure change. Aggregation of kaolinite platelets due to face-to-face, edge-to-face, and edge-to-edge interactions and temperature/pressure strongly affect bioadsorption on clays and flocculation of clay nanoparticles in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions with polymers. Multi-Time-Step Molecular Dynamics coupled with 3D-RISM-KH molecular solvation theory and Generalized Solvation Force Extrapolation (MTS-MD/3D-RISM-KH/GSFE) provides quasidynamics description of biomolecules. Validation included folding of miniprotein in solution from fully extended to equilibrated state in 60 ns, which provides acceleration by two orders of magnitude time scale as compared to 4-9 µs protein folding in experiment.

Hyung Ho Park

Yonsei University, Korea

Title: Mesoporous thermoelectric oxides
Speaker
Biography:

Hyung Ho Park is a Professor in the Materials Science & Engineering Department of Yonsei University in Korea since 1995. His research focuses on the preparation, characterization, and application of various functional thin films including nano-particle preparation, nano-hybridization, and nanostructure formation. Nano-hybrid thin films are prepared by the incorporation of nano-particles or in situ one-pot synthesis. Nanostructure formation involves nano-particle distribution in TCO and organic conductors and the control of nano-pore size and distribution in mesoporous thin films. He has published more than 380 SCI(E) papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of more than 5 journals.

Abstract:

Mesoporous oxides have a structure containing nano-sized pores of 2~50 nm and are prepared by sol-gel procedure using evaporation induced self assembly. The pore size, pore distribution (regular/irregular, open/close), and pore shape can be controlled according to the synthetic process, especially with surfactant molar ratio. The existence of pores in the material grants distinctive properties such as decreased thermal conductivity from increasing phonon scattering. Therefore mesoporous oxides can be used in many applications such as thermal insulators, thermoelectrics, gas sensors, and so on. The efficiency of a thermoelectric is determined by its dimensionless figure of merit, Z = S2σ/κ where S, σ, and κ are the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity, respectively. According to this equation, good thermoelectric material should possess large power factor (PF = S2σ) and low thermal conductivity. When introducing the pore structure, thermal conductivity can be greatly decreased but also with electrical conductivity due to electron scattering by pore structure. So, in the case of mesoporous structure adoption to thermoelectric materials, a minimum reduction in electrical conductivity while maximizing thermal isolation effect is a key issue for an enhancement in the thermoelectric property. In this presentation, various experimental approaches including a control of pore structure and introductions of dopants and nano-materials to enhance the thermoelectric property are discussed. Through the approaches, we tried to control the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity of mesoporous oxides individually to maximize the thermoelectric property.

 

Speaker
Biography:

P. M. Dinh received her Ph.D. in 2002 in high energy nuclear physics (Institute for Theoretical Physics in Saclay, France), and has been recruited in 2003 at the Laboratory for Theoretical Physics of Toulouse. She now works on the theory of multi-electronic systems (clusters, molecules) excited by intense electromagnetic fields (lasers, charged projectiles), within time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and beyond. She is a developer of the TDDFT code "TELEMAN". She has published 59 referred articles including 3 reviews and 3 book chapters, and wrote 3 books. She is a Junior member of the Institut Universitaire de France since 2012.

Abstract:

The quantum description of dissipative mechanisms in finite quantum systems is a long standing question in physics. It was originally addressed in nuclear physics, in particular a few decades ago, with the development of classical and semiclassical approaches but without no convincing fully quantum one. Therefore, many dynamical scenarios (where quantum effects still play a role in spite of dissipative trends) cannot be treated. Meanwhile, a strong experimental motivation, now in the case of nanostructures and molecules irradiated by intense lasers, has shown up. This motivated an increasing number of theoretical investigations, mostly on the basis of the well developed Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a robust effective mean field description of many low energy dynamical scenarios. Still, these TDDFT approaches fail to account for dissipative effects leading to the (observed) electronic pattern. There is thus a crucial need for a formal and practical route to account for dissipative/thermalization features on top of quantum mean field. We propose here a formalism allowing to describe the collisional correlations responsible for thermalization effects in finite quantum electronic systems. The approach is built as a stochastic extension of TDDFT. Dynamical correlations are treated in time-dependent perturbation theory and stochastic loss of coherence is assumed at some time intervals. This theory was formulated long ago for density matrices but never applied in practical cases because of its computational involvement. With a recent reformulation of the theory, applications are now conceivable and first tests have been successfully led in a simplifed 1D model.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Yoshitaka Fujimoto received his Ph.D. degree in Engineering from Osaka University, Japan. After receiving his Ph. D., he worked at the University of Tokyo and the University of Tsukuba. He joined Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology as an Assistant Professor. He has published more than 50 technical papers in peer-reviewed journals, reviews, book, book chapters, etc. and has served as referee of many international journals, organizer and committee in conferences.

Abstract:

Since experimental realization of a graphene sheet, two-dimensional atomic-layer sheets have received much attention from the viewpoint of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Among them, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) atomic-layer sheets are also expected to an important material since they possess several superior properties similar to a graphene. In the aspect of the electronic structures, both two materials exhibit considerably different features; graphene is a zero-gap material, whereas h-BN monolayer is a wide-gap material. One of the effective ways to tune electronic properties of nanomaterials is to apply strains to them. For example, the band gaps and the impurity states of h-BN monolayers are tunable by applying strains [1,2].
In this talk, I will report strain effects on the stabilities and the electronic properties of h-BN atomic layers using first-principles density-functional calculations [3,4]. I demonstrate the possible methods to tune the band gaps and the ionization energies of the impurity induced states in h-BN atomic layers. We also discuss the relationship among applied strains, band gaps and the impurity-related states of h-BN atomistic layers.

  • Speaker Session

Session Introduction

Zeeshan Ahmad

University Leicester, UK

Title: EHDA technologies for the next generation
Speaker
Biography:

Zeeshan Ahmad is a Professor of Pharmaceutics & Drug Delivery at De Montfort University (The Leicester School of Pharmacy). He is a Royal Society Industry Fellow (working closely with BlueFrog Design) and also leads the EPSRC EHDA Network (a highly interdisciplinary initiative involving industry and academia). He obtained his first and Doctoral degrees from Queen Mary (University of London). He has broad research interests in medical materials, their engineering and ultimate applications for healthcare (interfacing at chemistry, biology, physics and biomedical engineering). Specifically, these include various modes of drug dosage form manufacturing (smart nanoparticles and microparticles, bubbles, fibrous materials, printed constructs and transdermal/skin contact systems), tissue engineering (scaffolds and cell guidance), medical device coatings (orthopaedic implants) and biomedical material synthesis (polymers and bioceramics). He also has a very keen interest in novel fabrication routes (EHDA, microfluidic and emulsion methods) to address healthcare challenges. He has published extensively in the field and his research has been supported by The Royal Society, EU, Leverhulme Trust, EPSRC and numerous industrial partners (from large Pharma to SME’s).

Abstract:

This talk will focus on the emergence, rapid growth and future development of electrohydrodynamic technologies (EHDA). These technologies arise from the impact of electrical stresses on liquid media flow and the talk will show how initial simple experiments have been transformed to yield very complex nano and micro structures as biomedical materials and biomaterials, covering aspects of drug delivery and biomedical engineering devices. The talk will demonstrate structure diversity and future potential for such technologies and details for current challenges will be shown. Furthermore, the talk will also discuss recent collaborative developments between industry and academia to take these ideas and concepts forward.

Speaker
Biography:

Ola Mohamed get PhD in  Ain shamas university 2000, Associate Prof. in 2006 , Full Prof. in 2011.  Her fields of Interest; Leather technology,  Leather coating to improve its mechanical and physical properties. Using Nano technology in leather finishing, Recycling leather solid wastes and Recovery of chrome from tannery waste water using different nano- materials and techniques. Participate in many national and international conferences. PI for many international projects through scientific cooperation as France and China. Get and give many Training course and scientific Presentations.

Abstract:

Leather industry is one of the most pollutant industries in the world. It produces all types of environmental pollution especially in finishing step which uses organic hazards solvents. In order to minimize the environmental impact in leather industry, water-based recipes are proposed in leather finishing. The application of an acrylic emulsion as a top coat system provides an excellent balance of safety, performance and commerciality in comparison with other coats. Acrylic resin nanosize latex whose colloidal particle size is about 23 nm with solids content of about 25% was prepared by copolymerization of MMA and 2-EHA at different monomer ratios via micro emulsion polymerization technique. The best prepared copolymer so, it was modified with different ratios of silicon dioxide nanoparticles (1-5%), then studied the properties of the modified acrylic films and applied onto leather. The physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of coated leather before and after silicon dioxide nanoparticles application were evaluated and discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Ying-Chieh Lee has completed his PhD at the age of 14 years from Departmant of Materials and Science and Engineering, National Chung-Hsin University. He is Dean of Office Research and Development, National PingTung University of Science and Technology. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy resistive thin films were prepared on glass and Al2O3 substrates by DC magnetron co-sputtering from targets of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y casting alloy and Dy metals. Electrical properties and microstructures of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy films under different proportion of elements and annealing temperatures were investigated. The phase evolution, microstructural and composition of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy resistive films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM),  transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). When the annealing temperature was set to 350 °C, the Ni-Cr-Mn-Y-Dy films with an amorphous structure was observed. It is found that the resistivity of Ni-Cr-Mn-Y films was increased with increasing of Dy content. The Ni-Cr-Mn-Y films with 33.2% Dy addition annealed at 300 °C which was exhibited the resistivity 1600 mW-cm with -8.2 ppm/°C of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR).